European climate law

20-04-2020

On 4 March 2020, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a European climate law, setting the objective for the EU to become climate-neutral by 2050 and establishing a framework for achieving that objective. This would involve the Commission reviewing the EU's 2030 target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in light of the mid-century climate neutrality objective, exploring options for 50 to 55 % emissions reduction, and proposing a new 2030 target, if necessary. The Commission would be empowered to set out an emissions trajectory for the period between 2030 and 2050. The proposed regulation would also require EU institutions and Member States to build on their climate change measures. The Commission would have to carry out five-yearly assessments – aligned with the review cycle of the Paris Agreement – of progress made towards the objectives and of the consistency of national and EU measures with the objectives. It would be required to take corrective action and could issue recommendations to Member States whose measures were inconsistent with the emissions trajectory. Moreover, the Commission would have to ensure broad public participation. The December 2019 European Council meeting endorsed the 2050 climate-neutrality objective. In the European Parliament, the proposal has been referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.

On 4 March 2020, the European Commission adopted a legislative proposal for a European climate law, setting the objective for the EU to become climate-neutral by 2050 and establishing a framework for achieving that objective. This would involve the Commission reviewing the EU's 2030 target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in light of the mid-century climate neutrality objective, exploring options for 50 to 55 % emissions reduction, and proposing a new 2030 target, if necessary. The Commission would be empowered to set out an emissions trajectory for the period between 2030 and 2050. The proposed regulation would also require EU institutions and Member States to build on their climate change measures. The Commission would have to carry out five-yearly assessments – aligned with the review cycle of the Paris Agreement – of progress made towards the objectives and of the consistency of national and EU measures with the objectives. It would be required to take corrective action and could issue recommendations to Member States whose measures were inconsistent with the emissions trajectory. Moreover, the Commission would have to ensure broad public participation. The December 2019 European Council meeting endorsed the 2050 climate-neutrality objective. In the European Parliament, the proposal has been referred to the Committee on Environment, Public Health and Food Safety. First edition. The 'EU Legislation in Progress' briefings are updated at key stages throughout the legislative procedure.